What to do after a Total Shoulder Replacement

Total Shoulder Replacement Surgery – Home Exercise Program (0 to 6 weeks post-op)

A home exercise program, or HEP, is a list of exercises your therapist will assign for you to do on your own at home. Think of your healing process as an interstate, and you’re driving a car from point A (the day of your initial evaluation) to point B (fully healed).

Physical Therapy for Shoulder Replacements

Total Shoulder Replacement Surgery – in clinic modalities (0 to 6 weeks post-op)

After shoulder replacement surgery, it is very important to let your shoulder heal in the first six weeks. Most protocols call for passive motion only, meaning your shoulder muscles are not supposed to be used to move your arm.

Sheree’s Total Shoulder Replacement

“Best Program around”

Sheree Hester was very anxious about her first visit for physical therapy after shoulder replacement. Sheree works in healthcare and over the years due to heavy lifting and pulling, she was in need of shoulder replacement.

Ms. Hester’s plan of care started with pain control and maintaining the motion at her wrist and elbow.

Total Shoulder Replacement

 

Total shoulder replacement (TSR) is an option for persons who have severe arthritis of the shoulder joint. Severe shoulder arthritis is often painful, and can cause restriction of shoulder motion and reduces the ability to perform normal activities of daily living.  Arthritis causes the normal smooth cartilage lining of the joint to erode and the protective layer between the bones is removed.  

PT at Home for SAD

In order to optimize the rehabilitation process for SAD recovery. Your PT will follow your MD’s recovery protocol. Proper postural awareness will also be of extreme importance to your recovery. Slouching and forward rounding of the shoulders needs to be avoided as this greatly affects the position of the shoulder joint and can lead to further impinging of the bursa and rotator cuff tendons. 

Can PT Avoid SAD Procedures?

Shoulder impingement can often be resolved through physical therapy without the need for surgical intervention. If you require surgery, upon your initial evaluation at Elite Physical therapy, your physical therapist will instruct you on your physicians protocol for recovery. 

Following your evaluation, your physical therapy team will develop and guide you through an individualized exercise program.

Shoulder Surgery SAD (Subacromial Decompression)

The shoulder joint is comprised of the humerus (upper arm bone), scapula (shoulder blade), and clavicle (collar bone). The primary joint of the shoulder is a ball and socket joint known as the glenohumeral joint. The Acromio-clavicular Joint (ACJ) is a small joint formed between the summit of the shoulder blade (acromion) and the collar-bone (clavicle).

Rotator Cuff At-Home Therapy

Following a rotator cuff injury you will be given a home exercise program, or HEP, is a list of exercises your therapist will assign for you to do on your own at home. It’s a toolbox that you need to use to take responsibility for your healing process. The following is an example of an early HEP your PT might give you for a rotator cuff strain.

Rotator Cuff In-Clinic Therapy

Rotator Cuff Strain – In-Clinic Modalities

Rotator cuff strains are often treated with physical therapy. PT may be beneficial to avoid a surgical interview, in preparation for a surgical intervention or following surgery. The rotator cuff is a group of four muscles that work together to hold the head of your humerus in the shallow socket of the shoulder.

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