Rotator Cuff At-Home Therapy

Following a rotator cuff injury you will be given a home exercise program, or HEP, is a list of exercises your therapist will assign for you to do on your own at home. It’s a toolbox that you need to use to take responsibility for your healing process. The following is an example of an early HEP your PT might give you for a rotator cuff strain.

Rotator Cuff In-Clinic Therapy

Rotator Cuff Strain – In-Clinic Modalities

Rotator cuff strains are often treated with physical therapy. PT may be beneficial to avoid a surgical interview, in preparation for a surgical intervention or following surgery. The rotator cuff is a group of four muscles that work together to hold the head of your humerus in the shallow socket of the shoulder.

Rotator Cuff Strains

Rotator Cuff Pain: Anatomy & Kinesiology of the Shoulder

The rotator cuff of the shoulder is made up of four muscles: subscapularis, supraspinatus, infraspinatus, and the teres minor. Beneath these muscles lie one of the most complex and mobile joints in the human body. The shoulder (glenohumeral) joint is formed by the convex humeral head gliding in the concave glenoid fossa during active motion.

Treating Shoulder Impingement at Home

Once you have become familiar with your exercises and treatments that are involved in your physical therapy sessions you will be assigned a special HEP or home exercise program. This HEP is probably the most vital part of any physical therapy episode. Your physical therapist will develop and provide written instructions on which exercises you should be performing at home between physical therapy treatments and will be very similar to the exercises performed in the clinic. 

Treatment for Shoulder Impingement

Shoulder impingement can often be resolved through physical therapy without the need for surgical intervention. Upon your initial evaluation at Elite Physical therapy your physical therapist will instruct you through a series of special tests to determine if you are experiencing shoulder impingement syndrome. These tests involve placing your arm in a specific position and activating certain muscles of the rotator cuff.

Dana Williams’ Successful Recovery from Impingement Syndrome

Dana Williams had to put his golf game on hold until he could get relief from the pain in his right shoulder. After x-rays and a steroid shot for temporary relief, Dana came to the Cool Springs location to get help through physical therapy. In about 6 PT visits, he was seeing a big difference in his shoulder range of motion,

Understanding Shoulder Pain and Impingement Syndrome

Shoulder impingement is a very common cause of generalized shoulder pain. The shoulder joint is the most mobile joint in the body which also makes it the most unstable one Comprised of the humerus (upper arm bone), scapula (shoulder blade), and clavicle (collar bone) it connects the upper arm to rest of the body.

Kathy Perry’s frozen shoulder story

Hindsight is 20/20. It’s easier to know the right thing to do after it has happened. Here is Kathy Perry’s story of a frozen shoulder. Last summer, she noticed her left shoulder pain and how it wanted to freeze up and continually got worse. She ignored it until October. Kathy’s doctor prescribed physical therapy 2 times a week,

Frozen Shoulder At-Home Therapy

Since you will only be in the physical therapy clinic for 2-3 hours per week for Frozen Shoulder or Adhesive Capsulitis, your therapist will give you exercises to complete at home (HEP—Home Exercise Program) once they know what you tolerate in your PT sessions. This will allow you to take some of your recovery into your own hands and regain your shoulder strength and range of motion more quickly.

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